A “book” excerpt on hope.

A little while back (I seem to start all my posts with this phrase), I started writing a book of actual fiction, as in, not poetry, called Brass Towers. With less and less time on my hands, and still trying to finish the various projects of poetry I have ongoing, this one got a bit lost, but I still have some hope it might see light of day. Here goes a rough-cut excerpt that I like, considering I don’t have nearly as much experience with prose as I do with poetry:


 

(A reminder, this is a character in the work, and not actually me writing about myself, although… it’s probably both)

As I lay my head against the bed-frame, I hope for better days. Some hope for those, others hope for better nights, and along those plaguing and exhausting hours of sleepless thought: we hope. As human misery goes, we hate hoping as much as we require it, since it fuels our glimpses of those better days, because hoping is somehow less painful than anything else we could be doing. We hope for days when we won’t need to hope anymore, in that sickly irony of circular thought, and those better days have knocked our wooden doors thousands of times over, banged, even. They scream to be claimed, but we are busy at the moment, we are busy hoping that they will come. We are addicted to hope, and in such woven spheres of contemplation, even knowing how much hope can hurt and how much misery it can bring, we keep hoping… for days that aren’t as miserable, for days that never come.

If only, perhaps, the sciences of the mind or arts of the psyche could provide a more easing method of withstanding life and its barrage of variables, we could stop the cycle of hope, and we could once-and-for-all close that wretched box Pandora opened so long ago, or even erase our understanding of human inadequacies and undo Eve’s apple eating habit. But closing a box or un-eating an apple are far too mundane to syphon our hope, no, they are insufficient. We yearn tragedy, great loves tossed into the claws of cruel oceans, even greater minds felled by their own ambitions, high spiritual connections with concepts that have far evaded our reductive minds, all grandeur, all splendour and garish displays of agony, because we already have hope to give and sell, but a fictional character only translates fully into our reality when it becomes hopeless, because hopelessness takes the highest courage, and because it is the most tangible thing we could never be.

With my head still laid upon the bed-frame, I look back: my childish years, filled to the brim with hope hidden between rays of sunlight, I hoped pine cones would fall so I could harvest the seeds and eat them, I hoped my words could convince Felicity to join me into the endless quest of fantasy awaiting beyond those pines. My adolescence, stacked with confusion and hopes for lesser confusion, a deep yearn for better days in adulthood, those that we produce, direct and act inside our minds, running so smoothly and beautifully, with liberty as the soundtrack and hope… always there, writing the screenplay. Now, an adult, nothing runs as smoothly as I’d hoped, Felicity never joined me behind those pines of magical wonder, she instead moved to Delaware. And as fate would have it, the pine cones were barren and seedless. I still hope for all the same themes under different guises, all a match of semantics duelling within ones mind. Felicity was my hope of love, which I never felt; pine cones were my hope for luck, which I never had; and life beyond the pines was my hope to escape, which I never did.
I still hope for all those things, all those days, as much as I miss them, and between missing hope as it was and hoping for it to cease, there is little of me left, and even that little me seems to be annoyingly hopeful.


JOHNNY

Hoje sou tudo no nada que sou, amanhã serei outro.

11 thoughts on “A “book” excerpt on hope.

    • I was about to say the same thing! The flow, and the many short phrases definitely seem to be prose poetry. No matter what form it takes, it’s beautiful and full of great references. Once a poet, always a poet, perhaps. x

      Liked by 2 people

    • It just seems to be how I generally write haha, can’t seem to cast it away. Poetic proses have a couple more elements to them that aren’t present in this, but in theory, anything could constitute poetic prose, since the academic term is a bit under-developed after the outburst of poetic prose in France, during late-19th century.
      I’m still working on refining my prosaic writing in order to make it less poetic, since it can be exhausting at times. But I do relish the fact that it makes me somewhat unique in nowadays writing landscape.
      Thank you Kristian, you are always sweet.

      Liked by 1 person

    • There are a lot of elements that tie into scenes like these, hence why the work is augmented by its weavings. Of course, I strive to make each individual part stand on its own, but I’m very grateful for your sweet feedback.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ah I understand. Of course, there are probably innumerous intracies that relate to other parts, and as with any poetry collection or novel – they’ll augment each other. It’s nice to see you exploring so many new things recently! I feel as though I’m watching you grow 🙂

        Like

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